Rosy Outlook

From Spring 2018 issue of Minnesota Alumni

“That which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet,” said Juliet to Romeo. After that, he was putty in her hands. You know you’re being complimented when you’re compared to a rose. These flowers look good and smell even better. Luckily, the University of Minnesota has been busy for 75 years inventing long-blooming rose cultivars that can withstand, and even thrive in, cold climates. Roses were some of the earliest woody plant cultivars released by the U; they were offshoots of a chrysanthemum-breeding project in the 1940s.

Sp2018_RosyOutlookSummerWaltz_Inline

SUMMER WALTZ

2012

Look for: a profusion of double-cupped, frilly blooms in medium pink with a light fragrance



Sp2018_RosyOutlookSigrid_Inline

NORTHERN ACCENTS SIGRID

2012

Look for: a super hardy shrub rose with clusters of deep pink to red fragrant flowers


Sp2018_RosyOutlookLena_Inline

NORTHERN ACCENTS LENA

2008

Look for: a super hardy shrub rose with frilly, pink and white, five-petal flowers



Sp2018_RosyOutlookSven_Inline

NORTHERN ACCENTS SVEN

2008

Look for: a super hardy shrub rose with pink to pale violet, fragrant, double flowers



Sp2018_RosyOutlookVikingQueen_Inline

VIKING QUEEN

1963

Look for: a large, fragrant climber with pink double blossoms in clusters



Sp2018_RosyOutlookPrairieFire_Inline

PRAIRIE FIRE

1959

Look for: a durable shrub bearing bright red single flowers in sizeable clusters



Email letters and comments about this story to UMNAlumnimag@umn.edu.

MINNESOTA ALUMNI MAGAZINE, Spring2018

See All Stories

Stay Connected.